Podiatry Blog
By Affiliates in Podiatry
June 03, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Thyroid Disease  
Thyroid Disease and FeetThe thyroid gland releases and regulates hormones and is responsible for everything from heart rate to peripheral nervous system functions. So, you may be surprised to discover that this same disorder that may make you feel tired and brain foggy can also cause changes in your feet. In fact, your feet may be trying to alert you that something might be wrong with your thyroid.
 
You have dry, cracked feet

While we know that there are a lot of reasons why someone might have dry, cracked feet including being on your feet all day, long-distance running or winter weather, your thyroid might also be playing a role. Many people with hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid, complain of dry, cracked skin on the soles of their feet, particularly the heels. You may also notice that you get deep, painful fissures or that your skin seems almost leathery in thickness and appearance. This could be a sign to have your thyroid checked.
 
Your feet (and hands) always seem cold

Since your thyroid is responsible for your metabolism it’s not too surprising that an underactive thyroid slows the metabolism, which in turn causes the body’s temperature to drop. This is why you notice that your feet and hands always seem to be cold to the touch. You may notice that this problem is made worse during cold weather. Some people with hypothyroidism deal with a condition known as Raynaud’s phenomenon, in which the feet and hands are so cold that they go numb and turn blue or white.
 
Your feet are swollen

Again, there are a lot of things that can lead to swollen feet; however, if you notice swelling in your feet and ankles rather regularly then you may want to have your thyroid checked. Since people with hypothyroidism are also prone to developing tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can lead to permanent nerve damage if left untreated, you must have a podiatrist you can turn to for regular care if you have been diagnosed with a thyroid disorder.
 
If you notice any changes in your feet and you’d like to take a closer look, your podiatrist will be the best specialist to turn to. Should they suspect that a thyroid disease might be at play you can also speak with a primary care doctor for blood work.
By Affiliates in Podiatry
June 02, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Foot  

Taking care of your feet when you have diabetes is extremely important. It is easier to develop an infection when you have a foot wound or injury when you are diabetic. Poor blood circulation, a common symptom of diabetes, causes foot wounds to heal more slowly, which increases the risk of developing an infection. Dr. Jeffery Davis, Dr. Thomas Detwiller, and Dr. William McCann, the knowledgeable podiatrists at Affiliates in Podiatry in Concord, and Meredith, NH, can help you develop a foot care routine to keep feet healthy and prevent infections.

Types of Diabetic Foot Problems

A wide range of foot problems could develop as a result of an untreated foot infection, which is why it is essential that you take care of your feet when you have diabetes. Possible foot problems that could develop include:

  • Neuropathy or nerve damage
  • Calluses on the feet
  • Ulcers on the feet
  • Foot swelling
  • Charcot’s foot
  • Gangrene
  • Amputation

Treating minor wounds and injuries right away helps prevent infection and more serious health conditions. The experienced podiatrists at our office in Concord, and Meredith, NH, can help you maintain healthy feet.

Caring for Diabetic Feet

There are several steps you can take to care of your feet and keep them healthy. One of the most important things you can do is check your feet daily for wounds or injuries. Promptly treating any issues you discover, such as cuts or scrapes, can aid in healing and prevent infection from setting in. Look for cuts, scrapes, scratches, punctures, blisters, bruises, redness, and ingrown toenails when examining the feet. Apply first aid to any wounds right away. First-aid measures could include gently cleaning and drying the affected area, as well as applying an antibiotic ointment and bandage to prevent infection.

Some specific steps you can take to care of your feet at home include:

  • Applying moisturizer to the feet every day
  • Wearing comfortable shoes that fit properly
  • Wearing loose socks to bed
  • Not soaking your feet in water
  • Keeping your feet clean, dry, and warm
  • Wearing warm socks and shoes in cold weather
  • Trimming toenails straight across to avoid ingrown nails
  • Stretching or moving the legs and feet throughout the day to improve circulation

Consistently taking care of your feet when you have diabetes is essential for preventing infection and more serious foot conditions. Regular checkups with a podiatrist are an excellent way to maintain healthy feet. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Davis, Dr. Detwiller, or Dr. McCann, our skilled podiatrists, call Affiliates in Podiatry in Concord, NH, at (603) 225-5281 or at (603) 279-0330 for our office in Meredith, NH.

By Affiliates in Podiatry
May 12, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunion Pain   Bunion  
Bunion PainBunion pain got you down? Is foot pain making it impossible to do the things you once loved? Perhaps even the thought of putting on shoes and running your errands has you nervous. Bunion pain can do that. The good news is that if your podiatrist tells you that you have a bunion there are ways to easily manage this issue on your own without needing to resort to surgery.
 
First Steps to Treating Bunion Pain

Many people can easily manage their bunion symptoms and slow the progression of this common foot deformity through simple lifestyle changes. There are several approaches you can take to reduce bunion pain including,
  • Maintain a healthy weight or lose excess weight, which can take pressure off the feet
  • Wear shoes that don’t put pressure on the bunion, that provide ample support, and that have lots of room for your toes
  • Look for shoes that have a low heel (high heels can make bunions worse)
  • Apply a gel or protective pad to the bunion before putting on shoes
  • Talk to your podiatrist about the benefits of custom orthotics (aka shoe inserts) and how they could take pressure off the bunion when standing or in motion
  • Take pain relievers, whether over-the-counter or prescribed by your doctor
  • Warm or cold therapy such as warm soaks or applying ice can also improve swelling, inflammation, and pain (some people prefer the heat to the cold and vice versa; it’s a matter of preference. Try both and see what works best for you!)
  • Talk with your podiatrist to see if a night splint could ease morning stiffness and pain
There are a lot of products on the market today that are geared toward people with bunions. Do not be tricked into thinking that there is some miracle device out there that will realign the joint and fix this issue. The only way to realign and repair the deformed joint is through surgery; however, if you follow the tips above you may find yourself able to fully control your bunion pain for the rest of your life without ever needing surgery.
 
Reasons to Consider a Bunionectomy

Of course, there are certain scenarios in which a podiatrist may recommend getting surgery to correct the bunion. Here’s when you may want to consider getting surgery,
  • You are in significant and chronic pain
  • Your bunion is severely enlarged, and the big toe is crossing over the other toes
  • Your activities are limited due to your bunion
  • Your bunion pain persists for more than a year
  • Nonsurgical methods aren’t completely controlling your bunion pain
  • You are developing other foot problems such as bursitis or hammertoes due to your bunion
Your podiatrist will always be the first person you should turn to if you have questions or concerns about your bunion. They can also create a treatment plan and help you implement new habits into your daily routine to prevent a bunion from getting worse.
By Affiliates in Podiatry
April 27, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Foot  
Diabetic FeetWhen it comes to diabetes nothing is more important than living a healthy lifestyle and taking the proper medications to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing health complications. Along with turning to a regular doctor and endocrinologist, it’s important that you also add a podiatrist to your team of specialists to monitor and maintain good foot health.

Why is foot health important?

People with diabetes are at a much greater risk for developing serious problems such as nerve damage, loss of sensation, ulcers, and decreased circulation. This chronic condition also increases your risk for infections. Even small cuts and minor blisters can lead to a serious infection if left untreated.

This is why it’s important that any changes to your feet, even minor ones, are addressed and treated by a podiatrist rather than trying to treat the problem yourself. By turning to a podiatrist you can prevent further complications from happening.

How do I care for diabetic feet?

There are many things that you can do every day to maintain healthy, happy feet. This is something that your podiatrist can discuss with you when you come in for a comprehensive evaluation. Even if you have your diabetes properly controlled with medication, it’s still important to have a foot doctor that you can turn to for routine care, nail trimming, and more. Some tips for keeping diabetic feet healthy and problem-free include,
  • Washing feet with warm water and soap at least once a day. Make sure that you also clean between toes. Once your feet are thoroughly clean, also dry them off completely before applying moisturizer.
  • Never go barefoot, even indoors, as this could lead to an injury. Make sure to always check your shoes before putting them on to ensure that dirt or small objects may not be inside (as this can lead to injury).
  • Wear shoes that provide the proper fit. There are shoes designed specifically for those with diabetes; however, as long as you wear shoes that provide protection, optimal support, and the ideal fit, this is all you need.
  • You should always have your feet examined by a podiatrist at least once a year to check blood flow and to make sure that there are no issues. If you have trouble trimming your nails properly, you can also turn to a podiatrist who will do it for you.
If you are living with diabetes and you don’t have a podiatrist that you turn to, you must find one that you trust. Foot problems can occur out of nowhere, and when they do, a foot doctor is going to be the specialist you’ll need to turn to right away.
By Affiliates in Podiatry
April 09, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Metatarsalgia  
MetatarsalgiaWhile there are many reasons for foot pain, if the pain is concentrated in the ball of the foot (between the arches and your toes) then you could be dealing with an overuse injury known as metatarsalgia. Metatarsalgia can be incredibly painful, making it difficult to stand or even walk without discomfort. If you suspect that you might be dealing with metatarsalgia, a podiatrist can quickly diagnose and treat your condition.

What are the signs of metatarsalgia?

You could be dealing with metatarsalgia if,
  • You have foot pain that is exacerbated by standing, walking, or flexing your foot
  • Foot pain gets better with rest
  • You have a sharp or burning pain in the ball of the foot
  • There is a sharp or shooting pain in the toes
  • Your toes tingle or feel numb
  • You feel as if you have a stone in your shoe
Foot pain can happen for a variety of reasons, and mild symptoms typically won’t need medical intervention; however, if your foot pain lasts more than a few days then it might be time to consult your podiatrist.

What causes this foot problem?

Certain factors can certainly increase your risk of developing metatarsalgia. These risk factors include,
  • Experiencing stress fractures in the toes
  • Wearing high heels or shoes with a narrow toe box
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Having certain foot deformities such as bunions or hammertoes
  • High arches
  • Intense or endurance exercises such as long-distance running
How is metatarsalgia treated?

You can ease metatarsalgia pain and discomfort on your own through simple lifestyle changes including,
  • Rest
  • Avoiding certain activities and exercises that make the pain worse (e.g., running)
  • Wearing properly fitted and fully supportive shoes
  • Avoiding high heels or shoes that are too tight
  • Placing shoe inserts or padding under the metatarsal bones for further support
  • Icing the area multiple times a day
  • Taking a pain reliever or anti-inflammatory medication
Any new or worsening foot pain should be addressed by your podiatrist, as different injuries and conditions will require unique and individualized care. Don’t ignore your foot pain. If you suspect that you might have metatarsalgia, call your foot doctor today.




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Affiliates in Podiatry, PC

(603) 225-5281
248 Pleasant Street Suite 203 Concord, NH 03301

(603) 279-0330
169 Daniel Webster Highway Meredith, NH 03253
 
169 Daniel Webster Highway Meredith, NH 03253